Dr Mark Fleckner

Best Foods to Prevent Macular Degeneration by Garden City Opthamologist Mark R. Fleckner, MD

AMD, or age-related macular degeneration, is a debilitating eye disease that affects more than an estimated 10 million Americans, says Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner, MD. According to the American Macular Degeneration Foundation*, it’s the number one reason for vision loss, even more than glaucoma and cataracts combined. As its name implies, macular degeneration is the deterioration of the macula which is the functional area of the retina at the back of the eye.

There are two types of macular degeneration, says Garden City Ophthalmologist Mark R. Fleckner, MD. The most common one is called “dry” and affects about 85-90% of those suffering from the disease. The other type called “wet” is less common and involves leaking of fluid from the surrounding blood vessels, adds Mark R. Fleckner, MD.dr. mark fleckner

“Aging of the eyes is common,” says Dr. Mark Fleckner, “because the general structure of the eye deteriorates with time.” Since the macula is a big part of what lets you see, it’s affected too. The good news is that in some cases of wet macular degeneration, it’s treatable with prescription medications, Dr. Mark R. Fleckner of Garden City says.

Unfortunately, we don’t know enough about the origin of dry macular degeneration, so no FDA-approved treatments are available yet, says Dr. Mark Fleckner of Garden City. Even so, we do know a few things that will limit the degenerating effects of AMD.

Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner says since a large part of AMD is caused by inflammation, controlling the inflammation in the body is the primary key to slowing down AMD as you age. His primary recommendation for controlling inflammation is by not smoking. “Smoking is the #1 contributor to AMD,” Mark R. Fleckner, MD says. “We encourage our patients to stop smoking and also to eat a healthy diet with plenty of antioxidants and lots of omega-3 foods.”

Some of the most important foods you can eat to slow down macular degeneration are the dark green vegetables, Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner says, like kale, broccoli, spinach, Swiss chard, and parsley. No other food contains the micro-nutrients found in these dark green vegetables, and it profoundly affects the rate of degeneration, he adds.

“There is also an over-the-counter supplement just for eyes that I like to recommend,” adds Mark R. Fleckner, MD. It’s called AREDS 2, by Preservision*, and it contains high levels of a specific combination of the right vitamins and minerals needed to help reduce the progression of AMD. “It’s backed by more than 20 years of research from the National Eye Institute,” Mark R. Fleckner, MD says, “and it contains everything that’s helpful to slow the progression of the disease.”

Dr. Mark Fleckner

Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD Explains 4 Eye Conditions Associated with Diabetes

Dr. Mark Fleckner, a Long Island-based ophthalmologist specializing in vitreoretinal diseases, treats many patients with diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 100 million adults in the United States have diabetes or prediabetes, making it one of the most prevalent health conditions in the nation. Diabetes can affect the body in numerous ways, including causing vision impairment and even blindness. Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD explains four common eye conditions that can be a result of diabetes.
4 Eye Conditions Caused By Diabetes

Diabetic Retinopathy

People with diabetes have chronic high blood sugar, which can affect blood vessels in the retina. Located in the back of the eye, the retina is responsible for directing light and transmitting it to the brain via the optic nerve. High blood sugar can cause the retinal vessels to swell and become blocked, which impacts your ability to see. Because diabetic retinopathy presents no symptoms in its early stages, Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD advises everyone with diabetes should see an eye doctor once a year for an exam. If untreated, this disease can lead to vision loss.

Diabetic Macular Edema (DME)

Macular edema is a build-up of fluids in the macula, a part of the retina, which results in swelling. DME is a result of diabetic retinopathy and about half of people with diabetic retinopathy develop DME. The macula is responsible for focusing, enabling you to read, drive, and recognize faces. Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD says both DME and diabetic retinopathy can be detected in an eye exam.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of vision loss among adults. It can be present without diabetes but those with diabetes have twice the risk of developing it. Glaucoma affects the optic nerve, eroding the vision and eventually resulting in blindness. Like DME and diabetic retinopathy, eye doctors can detect and treat glaucoma in its early stages.

Cataracts

Cataracts can also occur without diabetes, but those with diabetes are two to five times more at risk. Cataracts involve a clouding of the eye lens, gradually decreasing vision. Most cataracts are age-related, but people with diabetes may experience them earlier and symptoms may progress faster. Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD explains cataracts can be surgically removed, though not all are operable.

To learn more about Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD and his practice, visit his website https://drmarkfleckner.com/index.php.

Dr. Mark Fleckner

Dr. Mark Fleckner Discusses 5 Foods to Eat for Better Eye Health

Mark Fleckner MDNutrition can significantly impact various aspects of the body, including eye health. Mark R Fleckner MD, a board-certified, fellowship-trained ophthalmologist specializing in treating diseases of the retina, strives to educate patients in prevention as well as treatment methods. He suggests five foods to eat for healthier eyes.

5 Best Foods for Eye Health

Leafy Greens
Leafy greens, such as kale, watercress, arugula, and spinach, are rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, nutrients related to vitamin A and beta carotene. These antioxidants can neutralize free radicals and reduce the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts. The body needs fat to absorb these antioxidants, so eat your leafy greens with a healthy source of fat, such as fish or olive oil, avocado, or nuts.

Eggs
Eggs are another great source of lutein and zeaxanthin, as well as zinc, another nutrient that can help reduce the risk of macular degeneration. Dr. Mark Fleckner says it is important to note these nutrients are stored in the yolk, not the whites. Eat the whole egg to get the most nutritional value.

Fish
Fatty fish, including salmon, trout, mackerel, and tuna, are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These “healthy fats” are essential for eye health and retinal function. The American Optometric Association* says omega-3s can reverse dry eye and help prevent age-related macular degeneration. These nutrients are also good for your brain, heart, and skin. Nuts and seeds, such as almonds and walnuts are another great source of omega-3s.

Berries
Berries, particularly blueberries, cherries, raspberries, and strawberries, are another food rich in antioxidants. They also contain high amounts of vitamin C, which can boost your immune system. A healthy immune system can reduce your risk of developing cataracts or macular degeneration. It also promotes faster healing if you are injured.

Carrots
Carrots contain high amounts of beta-carotene and vitamin A. These nutrients help the body synthesize the protein rhodopsin, Dr. Mark Fleckner explains, which helps the eyes adjust to the dark. Lutein can also help prevent age-related macular degeneration.

In addition to a balanced, nutrient-rich diet, Dr. Mark Fleckner recommends seeing your eye doctor regularly.

To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner and his practice, visit https://drmarkfleckner.com/index.php.

American Optometric Association* – https://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/caring-for-your-vision/diet-and-nutrition/essential-fatty-acids

Dr. Mark Fleckner Explains What You Need to Know About Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss and affects more than 10 million Americans. Mark R Fleckner MD, a New York-based and board-certified ophthalmologist specializing in vitreoretinal diseases and surgery, has treated many cases of macular degeneration throughout his career. He explains what you need to know about the disease and how to reduce your risk.

What It Is
Macular degeneration is an eye disease in which the macula, the central point of the retina, deteriorates. The retina is responsible for sending images to the optic nerve and brain. When it malfunctions, the macula can no longer focus and it is difficult for the person to see.

Dr. Mark Fleckner

The condition is most common in older adults as cell degeneration typically occurs with age. If the blood vessels in the eye are not leaking, it is known as “dry” macular degeneration. “Wet” macular degeneration occurs when the blood vessels leak and push the macula out of its position. A third type, known as Stargardt disease, is inherited and can cause issues with vision in childhood.

Symptoms
Symptoms typically present gradually. In the early stages, vision may be blurry and lines distorted. The person might have trouble seeing in the dark or experience blank spots. In some cases, a person might not notice any difference in their vision at first. As the disease progresses, the person might experience partial vision loss and new, abnormal blood vessels in the eye. Over time, the central vision will become blurry while peripheral vision remains intact. People with macular degeneration typically have trouble recognizing faces and shapes and making out details.

Treatment & Prevention
Dr. Mark Fleckner explains there is not currently a cure for macular degeneration, which makes prevention particularly crucial. However, eye doctors can provide different ways to manage the condition and reduce its effects. Dr. Mark Flecker says taking supplements of particular vitamins, such as vitamin C, E, lutein, copper, and zinc may help slow the disease’s progress. An ophthalmologist may also use intravitreal or laser therapy to fix abnormal blood vessels.

To reduce your risk, one of the best things you can do is stop smoking if you are a smoker, Dr. Mark Fleckner says. Also, wear sunglasses whenever you are outside on a sunny day, including in the winter. Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins C and E, zinc, and lutein. Dr. Mark Fleckner advises it is also important to see your eye doctor regularly for checkups; they will be able to detect the disease in its early stages when it is easier to treat.

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner Reveals What Autoimmune Disorders Cause Eye Problems

Dr. Mark Fleckner

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner says, “There are over 80 different autoimmune disorders, and some can cause eye problems.”

If you have an autoimmune disorder, then you are well aware of how it can change the body, nerves, and joints.

The eyes are also affected by these disorders and can pose a significant risk to your vision. Sadly, there are a lot of people who do not know many details about whether their eyes are undergoing changes.

One such immune disorder attacks and inflames the blood vessels in the back of the eye on the retina, which can affect vision. Yet, it typically manifests itself as a vascular problem. The name of this disorder is autoimmune retinopathy.

This underlines the importance of sticking to a routine of eye appointments. It is the most effective way to receive the proper treatments and medications. In doing so, you can lessen the impact the autoimmune disorder will have on your vision.

Dr. Mark Fleckner advises that everyone should get an eye screening, especially if they are at the age of 40 and above.

“No matter your age, if you start to experience changes, such as cloudiness, blurriness, pain, dryness, or light sensitivity, contact your local eye professional,” says Dr. Mark Fleckner.

Seeking help can change the course of a likely severe eye condition for the better.

Dr. Mark Fleckner is a highly-trained, board-certified ophthalmologist. He practices in New York and specializes in eye conditions that affect the retina.

Here is a list of some autoimmune disorders linked to vision health:

– Behcet disease
– Lupus
– Multiple sclerosis (MS)
– Psoriasis
– Reiter’s syndrome
– Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)
– Sjogren’s Syndrome
– Graves’ disease
– Type 1 diabetes
– Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease
– Uveitis

Another way autoimmune disorders can cause eye problems is from the medication needed to deal with these ailments. Some are known to affect eyesight as a side effect.

Talk to an ophthalmologist about your autoimmune disorder and the medications you are taking for it—it is vital to the health of your eyesight.

Learn about how the disorder you have might be impacting your eyes. Looking at the side effects medications you take can cause you to better understand if they are hurting your vision.

Regular eye appointments provide the opportunity to ask questions and get solutions before problems increase.

To learn more about ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit his website: https://drmarkfleckner.com/.

New York Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner Provides Details About A Vitrectomy

Eyes are more than windows to the soul, they are a valuable sensory organ that needs ongoing care to remain healthy. 

Board-certified Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner specializes in treating diseases that affect the retina. He is well versed in performing a vitrectomy and provides in-depth details about it.

“A vitrectomy is a surgical procedure that removes the fluid, known as vitreous from inside the eye(s),” says Dr. Mark Fleckner.

Many patients wonder if this type of surgery is dangerous. Dr. Fleckner explains what vitrectomy surgery involves to ease the minds of patients. 

He says, “Vitrectomy surgery is often successful, and it is usually done as part of other eye surgeries.”

The success rate for vitrectomy is around 90 percent. That number includes those over the age of sixty, so the odds are good.

Vitrectomy is an effective procedure, but its success does depend on the amount of damage to the eye. Risks increase if the damage to your eye or retina is significant.

One possible complication of a vitrectomy includes retinal tearing/detaching.

The purpose of this eye surgery is to treat an infected or inflamed vitreous. The procedure takes care of eyes filled with blood or bits of tissue known as floaters.

Vitrectomy is performed by an Ophthalmologist. This procedure treats conditions that affect the retina or the inside of your eyes.

  • Bleeding inside your eye
  • Eye infections
  • Cataract
  • Wrinkles, tears, or injuries in the retina
  • Detached retina
  • Major trauma or damage to your eye
  • Diabetic retinopathy
  • Macular hole

Dr. Mark Fleckner strives to ensure all patients are well-informed before eye surgery. He wants them to make knowledgeable decisions about their treatment for eye problems.

Dr. Mark Fleckner explains, “It is important not to ignore long-term eye irritation or changes in vision.” 

He says, “Contact your local eye care professional as soon as symptoms occur. Whether you have an eye infection or injury, let your doctor know what you are experiencing. The sooner, the better.”

The longer you wait, the bigger the eye issue will become. It also raises the chances of surgery complications, which you do not want to happen. Stay on top of your eye care routine, and have regular checkups to try and avoid surgeries like a vitrectomy.

You need to put your trust in an eye care professional. This is how you can safeguard your valuable sense of sight and maintain a lifetime of healthy vision. To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit https://drmarkfleckner.com/.

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner Provides Us Insight Into Our Eyesight: Posterior Vitreous Detachment

Ophthalmologist, Mark Fleckner, strives to educate people about eye diseases, prevention, and treatment.

One such eye disease is posterior vitreous detachment or PVD.

Dr. Mark Fleckner (8)Posterior vitreous detachment is an eye condition. It occurs when the part of the eye (called the vitreous) shrinks and separates from the retina.

A gel-like substance, the vitreous is a transparent liquid in the eyeball. The retina is a light-sensitive area at the back of the eye.

PVD happens at the back of the eye due to changes in the vitreous gel.

It sounds complicated, but Dr. Mark Fleckner breaks PVD down into simpler terms for us.

PVD is a non-sight threatening eye disease. Symptoms can include flashes and floaters in the eye.

The prognosis for PVD symptoms is that they typically subside over time. It can take several weeks to six months for them to disappear.

In some rare cases, patients might still have floaters for up to a year or longer, but this is highly unlikely.

Since PVD does not threaten the vision, it requires no specific treatment.

Dr. Mark Fleckner emphasizes the importance of regular eye exams. He does not want people to make their own diagnosis even if the symptoms sound like that of PVD.

Mark Fleckner states, “Symptoms affecting the eyes should not be ignored. If eye problems arise, it is crucial to visit an Ophthalmologist and to receive proper care.”

New York Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner is highly experienced in his field. He is the Doctor to trust with providing the insight needed to protect our eyesight.

To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit https://drmarkfleckner.com/.

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD Answers an Important Eye Question, Does a Retina Tear Always Lead to Detachment?

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, regularly receives questions related to vision and eye care maintenance. A highly-trained Ophthalmologist, Mark R. Fleckner, can produce answers.

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, is a New York board-certified Ophthalmologist who works with patients daily. During his interactions, Dr. Mark Fleckner likes to inform patients on how to take care of their vision. He will share any current eye issues, concerns, and solutions.

Dr. Mark Fleckner (18)

Most recognize the retina as an essential eye function. It is a thin, light-sensitive tissue that generates vision.

At times, tears can form in the retina, creating a risk of retinal detachment and severe loss of vision.

Dr. Mark Fleckner answers the question most have about the retina. People want to know, “Does a retinal tear always lead to detachment?”

Dr. Mark R. Fleckner says the cause of the retinal detachment is due to one or more small tears or holes in the retina. However, it does not always have to cause retinal detachment.

There are some crucial factors to pay attention to when it comes to the eyes.

Retinal tear or detachment is often seen in people who are middle-aged or older. These eye problems are also more likely to occur in people who are very-nearsighted, as well.

It can also develop in those with a family history of retinal problems. Even a severe blow to the eye can cause retinal detachment.

Dr. Mark Fleckner does not want those who have listed pre-conditions to lose hope. There are many ways to help prevent retinal detachment. First, it must be diagnosed by an eye doctor.

There will be symptoms. If there is a tear in the retina, floaters, flashes or sudden blurry vision will occur. With retinal detachment, the symptoms can be the same as retinal tears. There might also be the addition of an area of vision that may seem shadowed.

Mark Fleckner, MD, states that prompt treatment of a torn retina can prevent it from detaching. If not caught early and detachment occurs, eye surgery is necessary to repair it. Otherwise, patients will experience vision loss.

Several treatments are available. Dr. Mark Fleckner explains when there is a tear or hole in the retina, it needs immediate treatment. Eye professionals will recommend a particular type of laser treatment or freezing.

Laser eye treatment is often performed as an outpatient procedure that requires no surgical incision. The eye freezing procedure is similar, but with local anesthesia used to numb the eye.

If the retina does become detached, eye doctors will use surgical procedures to repair it. Mark Fleckner, MD, says that all surgeries press the wall of the eye against retinal tears. It holds both tissues together until scarring seals the tears.

Dr. Mark Fleckner also said that although a retina tear does not always lead to detachment, they can, if not treated. Regular eye visits are essential to avoiding vision loss.

To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit https://drmarkfleckner.com/.

Dr. Mark Fleckner Describes How Our Eyes Reveal Much About Our Overall Health

Dr. Mark Fleckner is a highly-trained Ophthalmologist in Garden City, New York. He regularly shares how our eyes provide us with symptoms that suggest the existence of some other health issues.

Dr. Mark Fleckner (8)Dr. Mark Fleckner expresses the importance of eye care and describes how it connects to our overall health.

If you want to know how healthy you are, take a look at your eyes.

During an eye exam, doctors check for clues of vision issues, eye health, and with it, the general health of the rest of the body.

Board-certified ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner says that there are eye diseases that have no symptoms. As a result, you may have great vision but unhealthy eyes.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends that people have regular eye exams starting at age forty. Eye disease often starts after this age. The results of initial eye screening are how ophthalmologists will determine recommendations and follow-up exams.

Those who have diabetes, other risk factors for eye disease, or additional vision issues should see an ophthalmologist sooner. They may be advised to have eye exams more often.

Dr. Mark Fleckner recognizes that some patients are surprised to learn about possible health problems that go beyond the eyes. There can be signs of health issues such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or a thyroid condition.

The reason these serious body health issues can be found during a routine eye exam is due to the eye being the only place in the body where doctors can noninvasively see blood vessels. Many illnesses like diabetes and hypertension affect the blood vessels, and physicians can spot diseases before patients are aware of it.

“Certain symptoms affecting the eyes should not be ignored,” says Dr. Mark Fleckner. A visit to an eye doctor is in order if you experience any of the following,

1) Yellow eyes. A yellowing of the white part of the eye can be a symptom of hepatitis, a liver disease.

2) Bulging eyes. If eyes suddenly appear to be bulging, it may be a sign of a thyroid problem. Bulging eyes can also be a manifestation of other diseases, such as a tumor behind the eye.

3) Red or bloodshot eyes. Red eyes do not always mean you do not get enough sleep. They can be a sign of an over-active thyroid, allergy, or an eye infection.

4) A sty or other growth on or near the eyelid. Any growth should be checked by a doctor. Particular eyelid or skin cancers can look like a sty or pimple.

5) Dry eyes. This condition often affects people when they get older or experience hormonal changes. But dry eyes can also signal an autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis.

6) Watery or tearing eyes. This can be a sign of corneal disease, a blocked tear duct, or an eyelash or lid problem.

7) Double vision. When double vision occurs, it could be related to thyroid disease, a brain problem, a tumor, or another disease.

8) Seeing halos around lights. Halos may indicate cataracts, glaucoma, corneal disease, or contact lens overuse.

9) Dots and spots. People may see tiny objects that look like small dots, pieces of string, or amoeba-like objects. They can develop with aging. However, if they appear suddenly as hundreds of small black particles, it can be a sign of a retinal tear or detachment.

By keeping your vision healthy, you can keep your body healthy too.

To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit https://drmarkfleckner.com/.

Mark R. Fleckner MD

Ophthalmologist Mark R. Fleckner MD Answers An Important Eye Question Does A Retina Tear Always Lead To Detachment

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, regularly receives questions related to vision and eye care maintenance. A highly-trained Ophthalmologist, Mark R. Fleckner, can produce answers.

Mark is a New York board-certified Ophthalmologist who works with patients daily. During his interactions, he likes to inform patients on how to take care of their vision. He will share any current eye issues, concerns, and solutions.

Most recognize the retina as an essential eye function. It is a thin, light-sensitive tissue that generates vision.

At times, tears can form in the retina, creating a risk of retinal detachment and severe loss of vision.

Dr. Mark Fleckner answers the question most have about the retina. People want to know, “Does a retinal tear always lead to detachment?”

Dr. Fleckner says the cause of the retinal detachment is due to one or more small tears or holes in the retina. However, it does not always have to cause retinal detachment.

There are some crucial factors to pay attention to when it comes to the eyes.

Retinal tear or detachment is often seen in people who are middle-aged or older. These eye problems are also more likely to occur in people who are very-nearsighted, as well.

It can also develop in those with a family history of retinal problems. Even a severe blow to the eye can cause retinal detachment.

Dr. Mark Fleckner does not want those who have listed pre-conditions to lose hope. There are many ways to help prevent retinal detachment. First, it must be diagnosed by an eye doctor.

There will be symptoms. If there is a tear in the retina, floaters, flashes or sudden blurry vision will occur. With retinal detachment, the symptoms can be the same as retinal tears. There might also be the addition of an area of vision that may seem shadowed.

Mark Fleckner, MD, states that prompt treatment of a torn retina can prevent it from detaching. If not caught early and detachment occurs, eye surgery is necessary to repair it. Otherwise, patients will experience vision loss.

Several treatments are available. Dr. Mark Fleckner explains when there is a tear or hole in the retina, it needs immediate treatment. Eye professionals will recommend a particular type of laser treatment or freezing.

Laser eye treatment is often performed as an outpatient procedure that requires no surgical incision. The eye freezing procedure is similar, but with local anesthesia used to numb the eye.

If the retina does become detached, eye doctors will use surgical procedures to repair it. Mark Fleckner, MD, says that all surgeries press the wall of the eye against retinal tears. It holds both tissues together until scarring seals the tears.

Dr. Mark Fleckner also said that although a retina tear does not always lead to detachment, they can, if not treated. Regular eye visits are essential to avoiding vision loss.